a call to action

If we could only comprehend each other…
…then we might stop killing each other.

Stop killing each other.  I know it seems the most expedient way to get what you want, but there is another, more optimal way: start talking with each other.  Through discussion and cooperation, we can revise and resolve all of our issues without violation and violence.

WITH

is a meaningful word.  It encompasses the communal aspect of talk, the sharing that is necessary for comprehension.

What we share is our understanding—merely a reality described by our perception.  We must, however, recognize that our perception is limited by our sensory awareness and then by our sensory attentiveness.  When we admit these limits, we assert that our understanding is simply our best description of our location, and as such is not necessarily a true description of reality.

What we gather by sharing is comprehension.  In order to form a greater knowledge of our actual environment, we can construct a composite reality by embracing all other encountered locations.

LOCATION

is the root difference between us all.

We seem to balk at this—especially us of the digital age—because it describes a limit to our lives, an impossibility of true empathy with others.  Such a notion, however, is unfounded; it neglects a greater truth: that those classifications do nothing to limit the infinite variation of humanity.

So, even though we all have a particular origin, a particular bloodline, and a particular niche at the present—we all also have an independent mind, just as subject to “mutant” thoughts (read: imagination) as our bodies are to producing mutant cells.  Such an occurrence facilitates adaptation, ensuring our continued survival in an ever-changing environment.  Such an occurrence facilitates true empathy even when our locations and consequent perspectives are wildly disparate.

One of the methods we have for expanding our own location is through the augmentation of the capacities of our bodies and thoughts with tools that expand our sensory awareness.  Yet greater exposure is nothing without contemplation.  We seem to claim that exposure is like a light bulb—you are in the dark, you flick a switch, and all is made visible.  But even when all is visible, all is not seen.  Exposure is only the beginning; it is mere awareness, and what matters next in our journey to comprehension—where we most often fail—is attentiveness.

ATTENTIVENESS

describes what aspects of awareness we consider before acting.

Our attentiveness is, unlike our awareness, under our direct control.  Awareness is an imperfect perceptual imposition; only through scientific application and focus can we reliably augment it.  Attentiveness, however, is our constant choice: identifying what matters so that we might conduct ourselves accordingly.

As a matter of choice, attentiveness demands education.  Uninformed decisions equate to ignorance, and it is the duty of this generation to use what is at our disposal to learn about our world comprehensively.  We have the opportunity to be wiser than our ancestors.  We are no more intelligent than any human in recorded history, but we have greater access to the truth of things than ever before.

a call to action

Study yourself; study the world.  To make no attempt at comprehending our world is to kill another; to make no attempt at comprehending yourself is to consign yourself to a life of confusion and needless torture.

I am not spouting hyperbolic drivel.  I have hurt others with my ignorance—physically and mentally; I have killed another—maybe scores of others—by simply doing nothing, by living a “normal” life in America.  This recognition is necessary to motivate my change as a person, as an individual in this great collective of humanity.

So, please reply in kind when I talk with you, when I share my location, and when I guide your attention to what I think matters.  Our conversation is the cooperative pursuit of comprehension.

Thank you for reading.
Thank you for writing.

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